We have a natural drive toward health; just as a plant, given sunshine, water and proper care will reach its natural maturity, so will humans reach theirs, absent harsh and punitive treatment. — Carl R. Rogers
Research Portal

Client and Therapist Variability in Clients’ Perceptions of their Therapists’ Multicultural Competencies

Owen, J., Leach, M. M., Wampold, B., & Rodolfa, E. (2011). Client and therapist variability in clients’ perceptions of their therapists’ multicultural competencies.Journal of Counseling Psychology, 58(1), 1-9. doi:10.1037/a0021496   Article Description: This study examined therapist differences in their clients’ ratings of their therapists’ multicultural competencies (MCCs) as well as tested whether therapists’ who were rated as exhibiting more MCCs also had clients who had better therapy outcomes.  Results demonstrated that therapists accounted for less than 1% of the variance in their clients’ Cross-Cultural Counseling Inventory–Revised (CCCI-R; T. D. LaFromboise,
Research Portal

Complimentary Research Methods in Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology: A Case for Methodological Pluralism

Davis, J. (2009) Complementary Research Methods in Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology: A Case for Methodological Pluralism. The Humanistic Psychologist, 37: 4-23.   Article Description: This article reviews the underpinnings of Humanistic and Transpersonal Theories in psychological research methods, natural science and human science. Additional Info Author Davis Date 2009 Keywords Research Methods, Transpersonal Psychology Link to Article Click Here Journal The Humanistic Psychologist
Research Portal

The Power of “Yes” and “No”: The Relationship To Consciousness, Probable Realities and “E-motions”

By: Cuf Ferguson, Ph.D., Co-President   The two most powerful words in the English language, and for that matter in any language, are “Yes” and “No.”  They literally create different realities.  Saying, “Yes,” to a person, event, circumstance, or experience literally points us, and our consciousness, in one direction, and saying “No” to that same person, event, circumstance, or experience literally points us, and our consciousness, in another direction.  Therein lies the power of “Yes” and “No.”  The point of our power, therefore, is in the present—at the point of